Ryerson Image Centre SLATE Art Guide Urban Gallery  
  Direct your mobile to www.slateartguide.mobi
Follow SLATE on Twitter  
   
Friday, October 20th, 2017 (events found - 15)

Filter results by selecting a Section:

reception 6-7pm
Mourning and Mayhem: The Work of Adrian Stimson.
Curated by Wanda Nanibush; presented by imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival and A Space Gallery.
Toronto's first solo exhibition of multidisciplinary artist Adrian Stimson, featuring a new performance.
Mourning and Mayhem: The Work of Adrian Stimson is a solo exhibition combining two streams of the artist's multidisciplinary practice: his experience in residential school and his commitment to the spirit of the buffalo. Buffalo Boy is the persona developed and lived by artist Adrian Stimson. Sporting fishnet stockings, a buffalo g-string, corsets, and pearls, Buffalo Boy's transformations and campy shenanigans challenge colonial history as a story of Indigenous disappearance and inferiority. Buffalo Boy's alter ego is Shaman Exterminator who inhabits the spirit of the buffalo here and now as a form of healing and transcendence.
Stimson's installation, photography and performances often enact a reversal of the value system that supports colonialism and the value system that marginalized Indigenous people as uncivilized. Through processes of mourning and mayhem, Stimson's work destabilizes these value systems with wit, irony, and campy humour while at the same time creating symbols of mourning that mark the trauma of colonial history that we wear in our bodies and communities.
Stimson often uses real materials like buffalo hide or the remnants of the actual residential school that he attended in order to ground his camp aesthetic in an actual experience or material reality. It is in the performance of play and the creation of spaces of mourning, in the creation of fictions and the maintenance of alternative histories, in the letting go and holding on to colonial trauma, and the engagement with the sacred and sacrilegious that separates Stimson from the rest as a radical agent of change and not simply a performer of postmodern puns. ... more
Mourning and Mayhem: The Work of Adrian Stimson.
Curated by Wanda Nanibush and proudly presented by imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival and A Space Gallery.
Toronto's first solo exhibition of multidisciplinary artist Adrian Stimson, featuring a new performance.
Mourning and Mayhem: The Work of Adrian Stimson is a solo exhibition combining two streams of the artist's multidisciplinary practice: his experience in residential school and his commitment to the spirit of the buffalo. Buffalo Boy is the persona developed and lived by artist Adrian Stimson. Sporting fishnet stockings, a buffalo g-string, corsets, and pearls, Buffalo Boy's transformations and campy shenanigans challenge colonial history as a story of Indigenous disappearance and inferiority. Buffalo Boy's alter ego is Shaman Exterminator who inhabits the spirit of the buffalo here and now as a form of healing and transcendence.
Stimson's installation, photography and performances often enact a reversal of the value system that supports colonialism and the value system that marginalized Indigenous people as uncivilized. Through processes of mourning and mayhem, Stimson's work destabilizes these value systems with wit, irony, and campy humour while at the same time creating symbols of mourning that mark the trauma of colonial history that we wear in our bodies and communities.
Stimson often uses real materials like buffalo hide or the remnants of the actual residential school that he attended in order to ground his camp aesthetic in an actual experience or material reality. It is in the performance of play and the creation of spaces of mourning, in the creation of fictions and the maintenance of alternative histories, in the letting go and holding on to colonial trauma, and the engagement with the sacred and sacrilegious that separates Stimson from the rest as a radical agent of change and not simply a performer of postmodern puns.
A Space Gallery (T.O. Downtown)
gallery tour & reception 6pm
Gallery tour and reception: "Indigo in Depth." Rowland Ricketts gives a special tour of the TMC's current exhibitions of Japanese and Latin American textiles. As an artist who grows and processes his own indigo, he will offer unique insights into the indigo-dyed textiles on view. The tour will be followed by an opportunity to mix and mingle, providing further opportunities to learn about the artist's practice and connect with other members of the local textile community. $30 members / $40 general public / $20 students. http://bit.ly/2xtMSvb or contact Susan Fohr: sfohr@textiemuseum.ca or416 599 5321 x2228 ... more
Gallery tour and reception: "Indigo in Depth." Rowland Ricketts gives a special tour of the TMC's current exhibitions of Japanese and Latin American textiles. As an artist who grows and processes his own indigo, he will offer unique insights into the indigo-dyed textiles on view. The tour will be followed by an opportunity to mix and mingle, providing further opportunities to learn about the artist's practice and connect with other members of the local textile community. $30 members / $40 general public / $20 students. http://bit.ly/2xtMSvb or contact Susan Fohr: sfohr@textiemuseum.ca or416 599 5321 x2228
Textile Museum of Canada (T.O. Downtown)
opening reception 5-8pm (see Oct 22 for afternoon reception)
Academy of Art Canada: Show & Sale. Academy of Art Canada is a private learning institution that provides a serious, sincere, traditional alternative in art training and artistic philosophy. Derived from the methods and thinking of the Renaissance through to the 19th century, it reflects a teacher-student lineage reaching back to the 18th-century French classicist Jacques Louis David. Portrait work takes on British and Italian influences, and in landscape, those of the Barbizon and Hudson River painters and Canada's own Group of Seven ... more
Academy of Art Canada: Show & Sale.
Academy of Art Canada is a private learning institution that provides a serious, sincere, traditional alternative in art training and artistic philosophy. Derived from the methods and thinking of the Renaissance through to the 19th century, it reflects a teacher-student lineage reaching back to the 18th-century French classicist Jacques Louis David. Portrait work takes on British and Italian influences, and in landscape, those of the Barbizon and Hudson River painters and Canada's own Group of Seven.
Academy of Art Canada | Student & Faculty Show & Sale (T.O. Yorkville/Midtown)
reception 7-9pm
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff.
Group exhibition of members of the Artists' Network featuring original artworks sized 12x12" and under. The Artists' Network is a not-for-profit membership-based organization that helps artists with their business practice.
Participating artists: Susan Aaron, Beverly Allen, Nancy Bennett, Kim Blair, Paul Brown, Charles Burke, Elsie Chiu, Franco D'Angela, Beth Fanjoy, Suzanne Gorenflo, Connie Gorsline, Penny Griffin, Karen Hall, Diana Hammer, David Johns, Morgan Jones, Loretta Kaltenhauser, Irja Ketola, Sharon Kirsh, Margit Koivisto, Corynn Kokolakis, Sandy MacKenzie, Jamie MacLean, Ineke MacNab, Pamela Mayhew, Emilio Mozo, eXavier Peterson, Manizhe Sabet Sarvestany, Lori Ryerson, Lorie Slater, Joanna Strong, Karen Taylor, Nami Ueno ... more
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff.
Group exhibition of members of the Artists' Network featuring original artworks sized 12x12" and under. The Artists' Network is a not-for-profit membership-based organization that helps artists with their business practice.
Participating artists: Susan Aaron, Beverly Allen, Nancy Bennett, Kim Blair, Paul Brown, Charles Burke, Elsie Chiu, Franco D'Angela, Beth Fanjoy, Suzanne Gorenflo, Connie Gorsline, Penny Griffin, Karen Hall, Diana Hammer, David Johns, Morgan Jones, Loretta Kaltenhauser, Irja Ketola, Sharon Kirsh, Margit Koivisto, Corynn Kokolakis, Sandy MacKenzie, Jamie MacLean, Ineke MacNab, Pamela Mayhew, Emilio Mozo, eXavier Peterson, Manizhe Sabet Sarvestany, Lori Ryerson, Lorie Slater, Joanna Strong, Karen Taylor, Nami Ueno.
Blue Crow Gallery (T.O. Central)
theatrical performance 8pm
Mortar & Pestle presents Breaking Legs, written by Tom Dulack. Oct 12-14, and 19-21, 2017. Mortar & Pestle Productions invites you to help kick off their second season with the fast-paced comedy Breaking Legs. In this farcical comedy we are introduced to a group of successful Italian mobsters looking to strike it big by entering the world of theatre by producing an original play. Enter Terrence O'Keefe, the down-on-his-luck playwright and former college professor and love interest of the Mob Boss's beautiful daughter, Angie. Throw in plenty of drinks, mountains of pasta, family, and a "hit" and you have the perfect recipe for a heartwarming disaster of a comedy. Produced and directed by Melissa Beveridge.
Tickets $15 at the door or online at: http://bit.ly/2xO6F90.
*Not recommended for children. Adult themes* ... more
Mortar & Pestle presents Breaking Legs, written by Tom Dulack. Oct 12-14, and 19-21, 2017. Mortar & Pestle Productions invites you to help kick off their second season with the fast-paced comedy Breaking Legs. In this farcical comedy we are introduced to a group of successful Italian mobsters looking to strike it big by entering the world of theatre by producing an original play. Enter Terrence O'Keefe, the down-on-his-luck playwright and former college professor and love interest of the Mob Boss's beautiful daughter, Angie. Throw in plenty of drinks, mountains of pasta, family, and a "hit" and you have the perfect recipe for a heartwarming disaster of a comedy. Produced and directed by Melissa Beveridge.
Tickets $15 at the door or online at: http://bit.ly/2xO6F90.
*Not recommended for children. Adult themes.*
Gerrard Art Space (GAS) (T.O. Central)
panel discussion 4:30-5:45pm
Curating in the Suburbs. At The Underground, York University. Curated and moderated by Emelie Chhangur, On the Edge of Curating: Toward new practices afield is a panel about curating that asks: How is “being on the edge” off-centred curating? Presented as part of the City Institute's Global Symposium Beyond Suburbia, On the Edge of Curating... looks at the specificities of curating in suburbia. Less concerned with highlighting projects and exhibitions that are about the suburbs, panelists Jordan Strom (Surrey Art Gallery, BC), Janine Marchessault (York University, PUBLIC), Randell Adjei (RISE, Scarborough), Émilie Renard (La Galerie, centre d'art contemporain, Noisy-le-Sec), and Emelie Chhangur (AGYU) position the performativity of the suburban context and their own embedded role in its milieu as having a constitutive effect on their working methodologies and on the future geographies of traditionally defined art centres. Dynamo suburban curators, Christine Shaw, Director / Curator at Blackwood Gallery and Alissa Firth-Eagland, Curator of Humber Galleries participate as respondents and to foster a dialogue between this group of curators for the future. For more information on the symposium visit: http://bit.ly/2fftp7P ... more
Curating in the Suburbs. At The Underground, York University. Curated and moderated by Emelie Chhangur, On the Edge of Curating: Toward new practices afield is a panel about curating that asks: How is “being on the edge” off-centred curating? Presented as part of the City Institute's Global Symposium Beyond Suburbia, On the Edge of Curating... looks at the specificities of curating in suburbia. Less concerned with highlighting projects and exhibitions that are about the suburbs, panelists Jordan Strom (Surrey Art Gallery, BC), Janine Marchessault (York University, PUBLIC), Randell Adjei (RISE, Scarborough), Émilie Renard (La Galerie, centre d'art contemporain, Noisy-le-Sec), and Emelie Chhangur (AGYU) position the performativity of the suburban context and their own embedded role in its milieu as having a constitutive effect on their working methodologies and on the future geographies of traditionally defined art centres. Dynamo suburban curators, Christine Shaw, Director / Curator at Blackwood Gallery and Alissa Firth-Eagland, Curator of Humber Galleries participate as respondents and to foster a dialogue between this group of curators for the future. For more information on the symposium visit: http://bit.ly/2fftp7P.
Art Gallery of York University (AGYU) (T.O. Greater)
art reception 7-9pm
Urban Reflections: The Abstract Art of Tanya Bastovanovic. Main Gallery. This art show features the latest abstract works of Tanya Batovanovic in oil and acrylics ... more
Urban Reflections: The Abstract Art of Tanya Bastovanovic. Main Gallery. This art show features the latest abstract works of Tanya Batovanovic in oil and acrylics.
Beaux-Arts Galleries Brampton (T.O. Environs)
reception 7pm
Ingrid Ruthig: RE|Visions.
The solo exhibition, Ingrid Ruthig: Re|Visions, builds on a series of 120 portrait-and-biography diptychs of women creators selected from throughout history. Ingrid Ruthig's body of work questions perceptions and the accepted version of our creative legacy, by examining the skewed nature of biography, the portrait, literary and art history, as well as an artist's sense of herself as creator.
Working with a combination of text and image from a wide range of sources, Ruthig references representations. "I'm fascinated by our collective determination to build, reshape or restore from fragments a narrative about the world and ourselves in it, and how we imagine the incomplete story with the unknowable end." Ruthig continues: "But that story is never entirely a reliable one." Through manipulation and layering, weaving and stitchery, her work scrambles perception and shifts the view to offer a re/vision of the individuals presented, in order to spur questions, to reveal the flaws and inadequacies of a man-made history, to re-see – rather than blindly accept as accurate – our text and image inheritance.
2016 was the Canadian centennial of women's suffrage, and 2017 is Canada's 150th anniversary. Here's a prime opportunity to reflect on the women who, through their art, helped shape our views in this province, this country and the world ... more
Ingrid Ruthig: RE|Visions.
The solo exhibition, Ingrid Ruthig: Re|Visions, builds on a series of 120 portrait-and-biography diptychs of women creators selected from throughout history. Ingrid Ruthig's body of work questions perceptions and the accepted version of our creative legacy, by examining the skewed nature of biography, the portrait, literary and art history, as well as an artist's sense of herself as creator.
Working with a combination of text and image from a wide range of sources, Ruthig references representations. "I'm fascinated by our collective determination to build, reshape or restore from fragments a narrative about the world and ourselves in it, and how we imagine the incomplete story with the unknowable end." Ruthig continues: "But that story is never entirely a reliable one." Through manipulation and layering, weaving and stitchery, her work scrambles perception and shifts the view to offer a re/vision of the individuals presented, in order to spur questions, to reveal the flaws and inadequacies of a man-made history, to re-see – rather than blindly accept as accurate – our text and image inheritance.
2016 was the Canadian centennial of women's suffrage, and 2017 is Canada's 150th anniversary. Here's a prime opportunity to reflect on the women who, through their art, helped shape our views in this province, this country and the world.
Station Gallery (T.O. Environs)
reception 7pm
Florence H. McGillivray: Finding Florence.
Back in 1970, Station Gallery opened its doors with an inaugural exhibition of Whitby's most famed historical artist. This posthumous retrospective of Florence Helena McGillivray brought exposure to a little-known and under-appreciated figure in the development of early Canadian art.
She was born on March 1, 1864 on a farm at the corner of Taunton and Lakeridge Roads. In the early 1900s she taught at what is now Trafalgar Castle School. McGillivray travelled to France in 1913 to further her art studies. Freely absorbing modern movements in Europe, she imported her influences upon returning to Canada.
She actively exhibited and pursued a career as an artist. She retired to live in Toronto in the 1930s, where she died in 1938. Her paintings are represented in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, Art Gallery of Hamilton and The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa. Many believe that she taught Tom Thomson a trick or two about painting.
During the sesquicentennial autumn, we'll revisit and retrace McGillivray's eclectic stylistic paths. Borrowing from both public holdings and private collections, Finding Florence adds presence and dimension to an artist who is only now rightfully attaining her esteemed place in Canadian art ... more
Florence H. McGillivray: Finding Florence.
Back in 1970, Station Gallery opened its doors with an inaugural exhibition of Whitby's most famed historical artist. This posthumous retrospective of Florence Helena McGillivray brought exposure to a little-known and under-appreciated figure in the development of early Canadian art.
She was born on March 1, 1864 on a farm at the corner of Taunton and Lakeridge Roads. In the early 1900s she taught at what is now Trafalgar Castle School. McGillivray travelled to France in 1913 to further her art studies. Freely absorbing modern movements in Europe, she imported her influences upon returning to Canada.
She actively exhibited and pursued a career as an artist. She retired to live in Toronto in the 1930s, where she died in 1938. Her paintings are represented in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, Art Gallery of Hamilton and The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa. Many believe that she taught Tom Thomson a trick or two about painting.
During the sesquicentennial autumn, we'll revisit and retrace McGillivray's eclectic stylistic paths. Borrowing from both public holdings and private collections, Finding Florence adds presence and dimension to an artist who is only now rightfully attaining her esteemed place in Canadian art.
Station Gallery (T.O. Environs)
first day
Shelley Niro: 1779 ... more
Shelley Niro: 1779.
Art Gallery of Hamilton (Ontario South-West)
first day
Abedar Kamgari: The Journey West ... more
Abedar Kamgari: The Journey West.
Art Gallery of Hamilton (Ontario South-West)
first day (see Oct 27 for reception), Main Gallery
A Sense of Place, new prints by Robert Creighton ... more
A Sense of Place, new prints by Robert Creighton.
Gallery on the Bay (since 1995) (Ontario South-West)
first day, Studio Gallery
Paintings, prints, sculpture by gallery artists ... more
Paintings, prints, sculpture by gallery artists.
Gallery on the Bay (since 1995) (Ontario South-West)
artist talks / special ceremony 6:30pm / final day of program
Your Own Grad School.
Participating artists: Michelle Bunton, Julia Chan, Gabriel Cheung, Frank DeSa, Taylor Norris, Deena Jacobs, Anna Soper, Erin Williamson.
Join us at the Agnes in celebrating a final "non-graduation" ceremony on Fri 20 Oct, 6:30pm, when artists will reflect on on their YOGS experiences and projects ... more
Your Own Grad School.
Participating artists: Michelle Bunton, Julia Chan, Gabriel Cheung, Frank DeSa, Taylor Norris, Deena Jacobs, Anna Soper, Erin Williamson.
Join us at the Agnes in celebrating a final "non-graduation" ceremony on Fri 20 Oct, 6:30pm, when artists will reflect on on their YOGS experiences and projects.
Agnes Etherington Art Centre (Ontario East)
life drawing / painting
Open Life Drawing / Painting (without instruction) is Monday & Friday evenings, 6-9pm weekly. $15 or a 5-session pass for $60 ... more
Open Life Drawing / Painting (without instruction) is Monday & Friday evenings, 6-9pm weekly. $15 or a 5-session pass for $60.
Toronto School of Art (Art Schools)